SPACE FLIGHT SYSTEMS RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS PROGRAM OFFICE NATIONAL CENTER FOR SPACE EXPLORATION RESEARCH EXTERNAL PARTNERS EDUCATION/OUTREACH SPACE EXPLORATION BENEFITS PROGRAM SUPPORT IMAGE GALLERY



.


header graphic
Deep Space Habitat


Habitat Demonstration Unit – Deep Space Habitat

Even in space, there’s no place like home

Regardless of what surface they’re exploring, at the end of a long day collecting geological samples or performing scientific experiments, astronauts need a base of operations to return to. NASA architects, engineers and scientists are already busy creating exactly that – sustainable, space- based living quarters, workspaces and laboratories for next-generation human spaceflight missions. The knowledge gained from NASA’s rich spaceflight history, as well as low Earth orbit projects, such as the International Space Station, is being used in conjunction with Earth-based analog research from the Desert RATS (or Research and Technologies Studies) tests in Arizona to identify and evaluate the most efficient combination of systems, the optimum crew size and best operations conceptions for exploration. NASA can then use the knowledge as we expand our presence to new destinations, like asteroids, near-Earth objects, Lagrange points, the moon, Mars or Mars’ moons.

Building a space habitat to maintain good physical and mental health during long- duration space missions is critical to long- term exploration. Incorporating “smart” habitat systems and safety features to mitigate the effects of the hazardous natural environment, supplying adequate air and water, providing waste disposal and recycling, regulating temperature, preserving food supplies and accommodating physical exercise are all issues that must be addressed to allow humans to perform deep space missions.

NASA is preparing for future space travel by developing new intelligent operating systems and hardware. To assess new technologies, NASA has brought together the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Project to develop habitat configurations for testing and evaluation. The HDU Project provides flexibility in testing and evaluating architectural configurations and mission operations concepts for possible destinations, as defined by NASA’s Human Spaceflight Architecture Team. The project employs a multi-center team – led by NASA’s Johnson Space Center – that pulls together resources, people and skills to contribute to this unique project.



Deep Space Habitat


Deep Space Habitat News

 

 

 

 

View Archives